Cost v sustainability

Cost v sustainability

Well, it’s a little late, but I hope that you have had the opportunity to take a well‑earned break over the summer. Let’s face it: in January the construction industry usually grinds to a halt, and just about everybody you’re trying to reach is away. We all need the chance to rest and recharge.

What will 2023 bring? As I outlined in previous columns, I have labelled 2022 as a year of transition – transition from the global pandemic and all the restrictions associated with it, back to normal or to the “new normal” – whatever that may be.

In travelling to and from the eastern states to my home in WA, I am surprised by how busy the airports and flights are. This is a good thing, as it  will raise confidence in uncertain times.

Of course, it’s also a double‑edged sword, because air travel is astonishingly emissions intensive.

And as most readers would be aware, sustainability is an important focus for me.

At long last we do appear to be heading in the right direction, albeit slowly.

I see some  form of government subsidy as being the path to achieving a better oucome. And I believe this will  come; it’s already happening in other parts of  the world i the form  of energy-efficiency ratings, which are required at the time of sale or transfer” 

One area of continuing concern is the residential sector, which is lagging behind the commercial sector. Why is this? As is often the case, cost plays an enormous part.

Although the commercial sector can fund to meet its targets, any changes to the homes that we all live in are reliant on the ability and appetite of owners to meet the cost. We’re talking about up-front costs here, of course – elements such as double glazing, insulation, proper sealing and external shading to name a few.

I see some form of government subsidy as being the path to achieving a better outcome.

And I believe this will come; it’s already happening in other parts of the world in the form of energy efficiency ratings, which are required at the time of sale or transfer.

The changes that are needed in the residential sector will also likely be pushed by the rising cost of energy. So although at first glance the increased cost around constructing residential buildings  appears to be a negative, ultimately it will be a positive, not only for us but also for the environment that we all live in.

This year I intend to get out and about more, and will hopefully attend a few AIRAH events in all states. I look forward to meeting many of the AIRAH members in person.

Paul Jackson, F.AIRAH
AIRAH President
president@airah.org.au

Ecolibrium Feb March cover

This article appears in ecolibrium’s February-March 2023 issue

Want to read more?
 

AIRAH MEMBERS

Click here to view our archive of issues and features.

NON-MEMBERS

Become an AIRAH member or subscribe to Ecolibrium.

What lies beneath

What lies beneath

Geothermal cooling is relatively underdeveloped in Australia, but as Ecolibrium staff writer Nick Johns-Wickberg discovers, its potential is huge.

Esteemed air

Esteemed air

AIRAH’s APER has been approved to register engineers in the ACT.

An eye for innovation

An eye for innovation

As CEO and co-founder of Conry Tech, Sam Ringwaldt, M.AIRAH, is rethinking our approach to HVAC&R.

Meet the experts

Meet the experts

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Air-Conditioners Australia, (MHIAA), is celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2024, with some special celebrations planned for ARBS.

The fans of Sydney

The fans of Sydney

Ecolibrium staff writer Nick Johns-Wickberg explores how a mobile cooling hub in the Harbour City prevented three medical emergencies this summer past.

Cool comfort

Cool comfort

Federico Tartarini is Senior Research Associate at the Heat & Health Research Incubator, Faculty of Medicine and Health, at the University of Sydney. And soon he’ll be starting a new position as a Sydney Horizon Fellow, Senior Lecturer at the School of Architecture, Design, and Planning, also at Unisyd.

ARBS

Advertisement