Full system potential?

Full system potential?

Alfa Laval has launched what it says is the first heat exchanger developed specifically for fuel cell systems – the AlfaNova GL50. 

According to Alfa Laval, fuel cells will play an important role in the global transition to green energy. By unleashing the energy stored in hydrogen and derivatives such as ammonia, methanol and methane, fuel cells can accelerate decarbonisation of hard-to-abate sectors such as shipping and heavy industry. The key to viability, the company says, is maximised system efficiency and minimised energy losses. 

“More and more carbon-neutral fuels are being created through power-to-X processes,” says Alfa Laval’s Malgorzata Moczynska. “Fuel cells provide X-to-power conversion without combustion. 

“To get the most out of these fuels, you must minimise energy losses at every step. This is the role of the AlfaNova GL50 heat exchanger – it helps fuel cell manufacturers achieve full system potential.” 

“The time is right,” says the company’s Tue Johannessen. “There is a growing demand for net-zero solutions. We know that fuel cells are more costly than conventional engines, but the high efficiency of fuel cell systems makes them very attractive.” 

Go to www.alfalaval.com.au 

ecolibrium-may2023

This article appears in ecolibrium’s may 2023 issue

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